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Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: "Jack Holding Maneesha", 1993
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 4th, 2018 (10:03 am)



Here's a very interesting photo titled "Jack Holding Maneesha", which was photographed in the neo-natal ward of the hospital in 1993 by famous baby photographer Anne Geddes.

Maneesha weighed less than 2 pounds (900 g) in this photo and was the smallest baby Anne had ever photographed. She was born prematurely at 28 weeks’ gestation, and was just about to leave the hospital after a long stay. The day this photo was taken was the first time Maneesha had been completely disconnected from all of her machinery.

About Jack who is holding her, Anne wrote: Jack, who is holding her, has huge hands. At the time, he was working as a groundsman at a local school, so his hands were also very weathered. I had placed an advertisement in the local paper for a man with "very large hands, for a photo shoot." As you can imagine, we had some very interesting replies. People even sent outlines of their hands by fax! I auditioned about 10 men, and Jack's hands were the second largest, but he had a warm, gentle personality, which was essential for the shoot.”

Anne Geddes the the famous Australian photographer of babies in pumpkins and with flower hats and such like that. Look below the cut to see Anne with Maneesha on her 21st birthday in 2014.

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Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: "Hand Feeding Elephant", 1963
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 4th, 2018 (09:58 am)



Here's a fun one for the "Hands" theme. It was taken at the Bronx Zoo in 1963 by photographer Garry Winogrand.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: "Hands of the Puppeteer", Tina Modotti, 1929
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 4th, 2018 (09:56 am)



Here is a photo by Tina Modotti, called "Hands of the Puppeteer", taken in Mexico City, 1929.

Tina Modotti was an Italian photographer, model, actress, and revolutionary political activist. She was born in 1896 in Italy, and 1913, at the age of 16, she immigrated to the United States to join her father in San Francisco, California. She then spent a lot of her life in Mexico, where she died in 1942 at the age of 45. Here is a photo of her in 1920:

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: Tintype of a Man and Child's Hands, 1875
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 4th, 2018 (09:53 am)



Continuing with my "Hands" theme, here is a very old photo of hands: Tintype of a man and child's hands, taken in 1875. Photographer unknown. From the still photo collection at the George Eastman Museum.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: Photo by Erwin Blumenfeld for Vogue Magazine, 1950
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 1st, 2018 (07:44 am)



Continuing with the hands theme, here we see model Pat Blake in a clever picture for Vogue Magazine, 1950, taken by Erwin Blumenfeld.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: Plaster Casts of Astronauts Hands, Ralph Morse, 1968
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 1st, 2018 (07:42 am)



View of plaster casts of the hands of NASA astronauts, taken for the custom fitting of the gloves of their space suits. The casts bear measurements, names, nicknames, and other text; the two at bottom center and bottom right are those of astronaut Frank Borman, who commander the Apollo 8 mission in December 1968. Borman is currently the oldest living American astronaut, and will be 90 years old next month. You can also see hand casts for astronaut James Lovell, most famous as the commander of the Apollo 13 mission, which suffered a critical failure en route to the Moon. There are casts for astronaut James Irwin, who was the eighth person to walk on the Moon and the first, and youngest, of those astronauts to die. Also seen are casts for astronaut Alan Bean, who made his first flight into space aboard Apollo 12, the second manned mission to land on the Moon in November 1969. He was the 4th man to walk on the moon. Photo taken in Houston Texas, in 1968 by Ralph Morse for LIFE magazine.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: "Hands of the Potter" by Anton Bruehl, 1933
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 1st, 2018 (07:39 am)



This 2nd photo in the "hands" theme" is called "Hands of the Potter" by Anton Bruehl, taken in 1933.

A bit of info about this photographer:

Anton Bruehl was a leading photographer in the 1920's and 30's and one of the first to work in color. He was born in Australia, came to the United States as a youth, and studied at the Clarence White School of Photography in New York. Later, he helped Mr. White run the school. In 1925, Mr. Bruehl opened his own studio in New York, specializing in fashion and advertising photography.

He quickly became one of the best known and busiest photographers in the country. He did portraits for Vanity Fair, covers and illustrations for Vogue and other magazines, and advertisements for a variety of clients, including a famous series for Four Roses whisky. Bruehl is noted for the color photography he produced in the 1930s for Condé Nast, which at that time had a virtual monopoly on the color printing process. Fernand Bourges, a color technician at Condé Nast Engravers, developed a four-color separation transparency process in 1932 that allowed the company to print color images in its publications on a regular basis. This collaboration--Bruehl's color photographs, Bourges's color transparencies, Condé Nast's printing--accounted for the majority of color images that appeared in print in the mid-1930s. Besides his innovative color photography, Bruehl was recognized for his stylish advertising still lifes, and for the celebrity portraiture and fashion photography he did for Vogue during the 1930s.

Anton Bruehl died at the age of 82 on Aug. 10, 1982, in San Francisco.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Hands: Carl Orff 1955
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at March 1st, 2018 (07:37 am)



I'm going to do a "Hands" Theme for a while. Here is a photo by Herbert List of German composer Carl Orff's hands, taken in Munich, 1955.

I never heard of Carl Orff, so I looked him up. Carl Heinrich Maria Orff was born in Munich on 10 July 1895. He was a German composer, best known for his cantata "Carmina Burana" (1937). In addition to his career as a composer, Orff developed an influential approach toward music education for children. In 1911, at age 16, some of Orff's music was published. Many of these works German poems set to song. Orff studied at the Munich Academy of Music until 1914. He then served in the German Army during World War I, when he was severely injured and nearly killed when a trench caved in. Afterwards, he held various positions at opera houses in Mannheim and Darmstadt, later returning to Munich to pursue his music studies. Orff died of cancer in Munich in 1982 at the age of 86. He had lived through four epochs: the German Empire, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany, and the post World War II West German Bundesrepublik.

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] "The Escape" by Wesley Howell, 1930s
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at January 27th, 2018 (02:33 pm)



One of the photos entered into the amateur photo contest in the New York Times' "Mid-Week Pictorial" in the 1930s. I think it's very clever!

Susan Trexel [userpic]
[reposted post] Boy With Rotten Teeth: Forsyth Dental Infirmary, 1920
by Susan Trexel (almond_cakes)
at January 27th, 2018 (02:10 pm)



A dentist holds open a boys mouth to expose his rotten teeth at the Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children in Boston, 1920.

The Forsyth family emigrated from Scotland in the 1830s. William Forsyth pioneered the manufacture of vulcanized rubber goods. His four sons continued his business interests in the production of textiles combined with vulcanized rubber, creating substantial wealth for the family. Before his death, James Bennett Forsyth had begun discussions of establishing a dental clinic for the children of Boston. The origins of this dream stemmed from a simple conversation with his dentist about the pressing need for dental care for underserved children.

In 1910, James’ two surviving Forsyth brothers, Thomas and John, along with their sister Mary, fulfilled his dream by founding the Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children in Boston, Mass. Opening its doors in 1914, the new clinic provided complete oral therapy for children, with an emphasis on prevention of dental cavities.

Dental interns and graduate dentists staffed the clinic. Thomas Forsyth remarked at the dedication ceremony, “It has been my wish that the Infirmary should be a home to the children, beautiful and cheerful; a protector of their health, a refuge in their pain.” In its first ten years, the Infirmary had treated over 150,000 children for dental and craniofacial problems.

The Forsyth Dental Infirmary focused primarily on the oral health needs of Boston’s disadvantaged children. In addition, it provided advanced clinical training for graduate dentists. These programs offered the opportunity for all children under the age of sixteen, regardless of socio-economic background, to obtain dental examinations and care for their teeth. More than 500,000 children, received free dental care at Forsyth.

In 1915 Forsyth embarked on its first scientific research program – discovering the first connections between dental decay and fluoride, nutrition and bacteria. As a result of these important discoveries, the dental profession was inspired to examine the scientific basis for oral disease. It also recognized that oral hygiene was a key factor in controlling disease. Forsyth was a progressive and pioneering leader in oral health in America; it launched the School for Dental Hygienists in 1916 and offered a highly regarded training program for dental hygienists until 2002.

The Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children is now called the Forsyth Institute, and focuses on research rather than training.

I wonder if that boy's teeth were able to be saved?

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